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Ecuador

The Quito Metro in 360 Degrees

Julio Cesar Casma's picture
 Paul Salazar.

For two and a half years, more than 4,000 people have  to build Line 1 of the Quito Metro, a mass transit system that extends 22 kilometers across the city.
 
With its 15 modern stations, ranging from Quitumbe in the south to El Labrador in the north, this infrastructure project is changing the urban landscape of the Ecuadorian capital and will become the backbone of the city’s integrated transport system. How is it coming along?

Confronting tobacco illicit trade: a global review of country experiences

Sheila Dutta's picture



Illicit trade in tobacco products undermines global tobacco prevention and control interventions, particularly with respect to tobacco tax policy. From a public health perspective, illicit trade weakens the effect of tobacco excise taxes on tobacco consumption - and consequently on preventable morbidity and mortality - by increasing the affordability, attractiveness, and/or availability of tobacco products. Furthermore, tobacco illicit trade often depends on and can contribute to weakened governance.

Teach: Tackling the learning crisis, one classroom at a time

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | Español | Portuguese | Arabic
 



Despite tremendous progress in getting children into the classroom, we are experiencing a global learning crisis, where a large share of children complete primary school . What explains this phenomenon? To answer this question, consider the following examples of classrooms that are unlikely to put students on a path to success. 

Accessibility and inclusion: Two key factors for individuals with disabilities

Sofía Guerrero Gámez's picture
 dos aspectos clave para las personas con discapacidad

Globally, over one billion people – 15% of the population – live with some form of disability,  according to the World Health Organization’s . Beyond their physical, mental or sensory impairments, people with disabilities face barriers for inclusion in different aspects of life. They tend to have fewer socioeconomic opportunities, more limited access to education and higher poverty rates. Stigma and discrimination are sometimes the main barrier to their full, equal participation. How can this situation be addressed?

Trains to the future… and past – history and archaeology in underground transport systems

Barbara Minguez Garcia's picture


Today we are creating better, faster, more comfortable, and secure transport systems for our smarter, resilient, more inclusive, and competitive cities. At the same time, we need to ensure the preservation of the cultural values and the heritage, which form the unique identity of every city. This will only be possible if we establish a balance between the past, the present, and the future – by allowing new developments, allowing time for research and study, and allowing space to share the knowledge.

Student assessment: Supporting the development of human capital

Julia Liberman's picture



At the , the World Bank highlighted the importance of human capital for economic development.
 
Central to the World Bank’s motivation for the is evidence that investments in education and health produce better-educated and healthier individuals, as well as faster economic growth and a range of benefits to society more broadly. As part of this effort to accelerate more and better investments in people, the new Human Capital Index provides information on productivity-related human capital outcomes, seeking to answer how much human capital a child born today will acquire by the end of secondary school, given the risks to poor health and education that prevail in the country where she or he was born.

With ActiVaR, Ecuador launches its first immersive training program

Diego Angel-Urdinola's picture


A few years ago, it would have been unlikely for a young Latin American student from a disadvantaged background to be able to access high-quality technical training using state-of-the-art technology and laboratories.
 

Solving for water security at the source

Andrea Erickson's picture

Aerial view looking south toward the Gulf of Mexico down the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana.
Photo © Carlton Ward Jr.
 

New York City faced a challenge in the 1990s: the city needed a new water filtration system to serve its nearly 8 million people. But the prospect of spending $6 to 10 billion on a new water treatment plant, and another $100 million on annual operating costs, was daunting. So, city officials took a closer look at the source of their water—the Catskill Mountains.
 
Water from the Catskills flows through 120 miles of forests, farmlands and towns to reach New York City. When that landscape is healthy, it acts as a natural purifying system, but certain development and agricultural practices can result in impaired water quality. For city officials, reaching out to local farmers and landowners and compensating them to restore and conserve their lands in the watershed, combined with some land acquisition, proved to be significantly cheaper than building and operating a new treatment plant.
 

Why are energy subsidy reforms so unpopular?

Guillermo Beylis's picture

It is well established in the economic literature that it’s the rich who benefit from the lion’s share of energy subsidies. Yet, it is often the poor and vulnerable who protest loudly against these reforms. Why does this happen? What are we missing?


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