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SDGs

Paying for development – Governments are sitting on a ‘goldmine’

Marco Scuriatti's picture
Shanghai at night, Huangpu River.  © Wu Zhiyi/World Bank
Shanghai at night, Huangpu River.  © Wu Zhiyi/World Bank

Investments in human, social, and physical capital are at the core of sustainable and inclusive growth – and represent an important share of national budgets.

At the World Bank Group we have been at the forefront of the so-called Financing for Development (FfD) agenda to leverage public, private, international, and domestic sources of capital to help reach the global goals.  A short primer on our efforts--which builds on the 2015 Development Committee paper --can be found in the brochure entitled .

Ultimately, countries own the responsibility for achieving the SDGs: raising more domestic revenue (and doing so more efficiently), addressing spending inefficiencies, and mobilizing private capital (as the world economy is facing potentially slower growth and political friction). These will not be easy challenges.  

Empowering women entrepreneurs to achieve the SDGs

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture
© Photos courtesy of Vandana Suri (left) and Saida Yusupova (right).
© Photos courtesy of Vandana Suri (left) and Saida Yusupova (right).

Women are not just potential beneficiaries of efforts to achieve the ambitious (SDGs) by 2030. They are also active participants in achieving them. That’s why we organized the competition to highlight the efforts of women entrepreneurs to create jobs and help reach the global goals.
 
The cannot be realized without the participation of women, particularly those working in the private sector. Indeed, if women had the same lifetime earnings as men,  by $160 trillion—an average of $23,620 per person—in 141 countries studied by the World Bank.

Protecting the interests of persons with disabilities

Zainab Mukhtar's picture
Disabled people are among the most vulnerable populations in developing countries such as Nigeria, as they lack equal access and opportunity. Photo: 2018 European Union (photo by Samuel Ochai)


The popular saying“do not judge a book by its cover” teaches a great lesson which can be summed up in one sentence: It is never what we think it is.

This leads me to why protecting the interests of persons with disabilities (PWDs) is important; many times, they are treated as if all they are is their physical or mental challenges. But they are more than just their disability. Every human being, rich or poor, small or big, non-disabled or disabled has a role to play in our lives, and our ability to treat everyone with dignity and respect cannot be overemphasized. Thus, as I explained in my recent proposal in the World Bank Group’s , lack of equal access and opportunity for PWDs will in the long-run impede the necessary development many of us desire in our world.

Taking stock: knowledge sharing as a driver for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

Steffen Janus's picture

Image: United Nations

Another year has passed, and we are only 11 years away from the goalpost of the (Agenda 2030).

In the past few years, knowledge sharing has moved to the center of global development as a third pillar complementing financial and technical assistance. Agenda 2030 calls for enhancing “knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms,” while the encourages knowledge sharing in sectors contributing to the achievement of the SDGs.

For cities, this means that

How do Africans’ priorities align with the SDGs and government performance? New results from Afrobarometer



One of the challenges presented by the ambitious laid out in the UN 2030 Agenda is where to begin.

, which conducts public attitude surveys in more than 30 African countries, argues that one critical place to start is by asking the people.

Women and migration: Exploring the data

Eliana Rubiano-Matulevich's picture

International Migrants Day is a call to disseminate information on international migration and look toward further understanding its intersection with economic growth and socioeconomic wellbeing. Here we draw on data from the World Bank Gender Data Portal to highlight four big facts about women AND international migration. We focus on the “international migrant stock” which is the number of people born in a country other than that in which they live. Women, men, boys and girls experience migration differently. Accurate and timely sex-disaggregated data on international migration is critical for uncovering the specific needs and vulnerabilities of women and men and for shaping migration policy.

Globally, women are on the move: they comprise slightly less than half of all international, global migrants. In fact, the share of women among global, international migrants has only fallen slightly during the last three decades, from 49 percent in 1990 to 47 percent in 2017.

Scaling the use of Islamic finance for infrastructure: MDBs can help

Sara Ahmed and Ashraf Bouajina's picture



Using Islamic finance for infrastructure development attracted more attention recently in the quest to maximize finance for development.

At the recent World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings in Bali, the World Bank and the Islamic Development Bank (IsDB) co-hosted a symposium on Islamic infrastructure finance, building on the institutions’ strategic partnership. As we note in , the asset-backed, ring-fenced, and project-specific nature of Islamic finance structures and their emphasis on sharing risks make them a natural fit for infrastructure public-private partnerships (PPPs).

Green Bonds: From evolution to revolution

Heike Reichelt's picture
© ThickStock.com/Getty Images
© ThickStock.com/Getty Images

The first green bond issued by the World Bank 10 years ago created the blueprint for today’s US$500+ billion labeled bond market. This blog post looks at how green bonds changed investor and issuer behavior and how the same model can be applied to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.


The capital markets have evolved over the last 10 years from a market where investors knew - and cared - little about what their investments were supporting, to one where purpose matters more than ever.

The green bond market has grown from a market dominated by issuers like the World Bank, an international organization owned by 189 countries with the sole purpose of eradicating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity, to one that includes a broad range of issuers - from private companies and banks, to utilities and governments.

Global solidarity to finance the Sustainable Development Goals

Jeffrey D. Sachs's picture

Achieving sustainable development depends on incremental investments in six priority transformations: building human capacities (health, education, new job skills); decarbonising energy; promoting sustainable agriculture and biodiversity; building smarter cities; implementing the circular economy; and harnessing the digital revolution. As such, sustainable development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular pose a financing challenge. There are three distinct financing conundrums to solve: financing complex infrastructure, financing public services and amenities, and shifting investments from unsustainable to sustainable technologies. I discuss these in turn.

Quantifying public spaces for better quality of urban assets

Hyunji Lee's picture
Photo by Hyunji Lee / World Bank

A stage is now ready for public urban spaces.
 
“By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, particularly for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities” – Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 11.7
 
The importance of public space is highlighted in international agendas, and diverse organizations started piloting the role of urban planning and public spaces in cities.


For instance,  UN Women launched the  report, which enhanced public spaces designs with better lighting and CCTVs to prevent and respond to sexual violence against women. There are more onboard, including the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on   and the World Health Organization (WHO) on. The World Bank has also committed to enhancing public spaces across cities including , , and .

To realize these collective efforts, better measurement tools are vital to follow up with evidence-based approaches. On July 11th, 2018, UN-HABITAT and ISOCARP held a side event during the High-Level Political Forum at the UN, titled “.” While speakers from various organizations including the World Bank presented their works, three key questions were raised regarding our future steps:


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