Syndicate content

Private Sector Development

Lessons from the West Bank’s first PPP: Fragile state + open mind

Malak Draz's picture


“If you want something new, you have to stop doing something old,”—good advice from innovation and management guru . This approach was key to a PPP we coordinated in one of the world’s oldest areas, the West Bank.
 

Cents and sensibility: three takeaways on investment incentives from Amazon HQ2

Hania Kronfol's picture
In a surprising turn of events, a few weeks ago, its plans to build a corporate campus in New York City after facing backlash from lawmakers, activists and union leaders voicing concern on the incentives offered as well as the impact the investment would have on the cost of living and the city’s identity.

Independent Directors in Latin America, a time for change?

Oliver Orton's picture


Carl Fuerstenberg, one of the most prominent German bankers of his generation, famously said more than a century ago that shareholders are irrational and impertinent. They are irrational, he said, because they entrust their money to people they don’t control, and impertinent because they expect to receive dividends as a reward for their foolishness.

This dynamic lies at the very heart of the corporate governance challenges faced by many companies and is especially acute in Latin America.

South Asia can get more women to work

Hiska Reyes's picture
 World Bank
South Asian countries are making progress in clearing the way for women to get jobs and creating a safer work environment for them. Yet, too many women across South Asia are left out of the workforce—and that despite booming economic growth. Credit: World Bank

This blog is part of a series examining women’s economic empowerment in South Asia. Starting today on International Women's Day and over the next few weeks, we will be exploring successful interventions, research, and experience to improve gender equality across the region. 

Meet Fazeela Dharmaratne from Sri Lanka.
 
Her story, like that of millions of other women in South Asia, is one of struggle between family and work and a story worth telling as we mark International Women’s Day.
 
Unlike too many of her female peers, Fazeela was able to reinvent herself professionally.
 
As a young woman, straight out of school, she joined a bank in Colombo as a banking assistant. In 17 years, she climbed up the corporate ladder to become regional manager—a position she later quit to care for her children.
 
Unfazed, Fazeela started her own small home-based daycare business in 2012, initially serving only 4-5 children. Today, Fazeela is the director of the CeeBees pre-school and childcare centers serving several corporate clients in Colombo.
 
Fazeela’s success belies the fact that
 
And while employment rates have gone down across the region, women account for most of this decline.
 

 
These numbers are worrying because a drop in female employment has important social costs.
 
First, when women control a greater share of household incomes, children are healthier and do better in school.
 
Second, when women work for pay, they have a greater voice in their households, in their communities, and society.
 
Conversely,
 
A by the International Monetary Fund estimated that
 
The good news is that

Sri Lanka’s women want to work—and thrive in the workplace

Idah Z. Pswarayi-Riddihough's picture
A woman hand painting fabric in a local Batik fabric factory
A Sri Lankan woman is hand painting fabric in a local Batik fabric factory. Matale, Sri Lanka. Credit: Shutterstock. January 3, 2017.



Being a woman, mother, sister, aunt – name it, it’s something women wake up to daily and they love it.  None of them question about being enumerated for these roles.  We marvel and revel in the roles. 

But make no mistake.

Women want to work, and they want to stay in the workplace. 

What they seek is balance: a gender-balanced workplace, a gender-balanced management, and more gender-balance in sharing wealth and prosperity. 

In that sense, it’s heartening to see some of the proposals put forth in the government of Sri Lanka’s budget: more daycare centers, flexible work hours, and incentives to promote maternity leave. 

These are very welcome changes to think equal, build smart, innovate for change—the 2019 International Women's Day campaign theme—and we encourage those with jobs to implement these policy changes. 

This year, let me share with you

How a new insolvency regime increases opportunities for entrepreneurship in the Dominican Republic

Andrés F. Martínez's picture

View from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic / World Bank

Published in digital portal

In the past, a company in the Dominican Republic facing financial difficulties, such as falling behind on tax payments and having outstanding debts with suppliers and cashflow problems, usually faced bankruptcy, with low rates of recovery.

Skilling up Bangladeshi women

Tashmina Rahman's picture
Learning new skills for better jobs in Bangladesh: Meet Kamrul Nahar Omi




Non-garment industries such as leather, furniture, hospitality and Information & Technology (IT) are also poised to grow.

But how can we , the theme of this year’s International Women’s Day? 

Female participation in the workforce has been increasing but remains less than half of male participation rates across primary working ages.

Of those females joining work, over 80 percent are engaged in low-skilled, low-productivity jobs in the informal sector with little opportunity for career progression.

.  



Yet, Bangladesh still has a long way to go with female share in enrollments around 25 percent in TVET programs.

In fact, a  identifies some keys areas of intervention for improving female participation in technical diploma programs:

  1. creating a gender-friendly environment in polytechnics and workplaces;
  2. developing more service-orientated diploma programs;
  3. developing a TVET awareness campaign for females;
  4. (supporting a career counseling and guidance system for females;
  5. improving access to higher education;
  6. providing demand-stimulating incentives; (vii) generating research and knowledge;
  7. leveraging partnerships to promote opportunities for females and
  8. generating more and better data to track progress and inform policy and operations for female-friendly TVET. 

Applauding the women leaders in South Asia

Hartwig Schafer's picture

I just ended my first round of country visits as the World Bank’s Vice President for the South Asia Region.  Over and above all, that I had the privilege to meet during my visits.

These women are succeeding in a region where it is hard for women to realize their career dreams. .

What better opportunity than International Women’s Day to give a huge shout-out and applaud those women who are role models, entrepreneurs, and leaders in the eight countries of South Asia.

Neha Sharma, the district magistrate in Baghai village and Hart Schafer in India
Baghai village in Firozabad district, Uttar Pradesh, India. Photo: World Bank

Holding up half the sky—and some blogs

Cara Santos Pianesi's picture




Bloggers write to share unique insights. They may want to simply share knowledge, push an issue forward, establish thought leadership, and in some cases drive business.

Bloggers also create community. For example, this blog platform reaches a subscribed community (25K in number!) interested in infrastructure finance, PPPs, and the use of guarantees to spur private-sector investments—especially in developing countries. With niche topics like this, a blogspace becomes a virtual gathering place where we can exchange war stories, spectacular examples, best practices, trends, and opinions. We can know that others care about the same topics. We can also blog to shape the demographics of discourse and raise specific voices.

The jobs challenge is bigger than ever in the poorest countries

Akihiko Nishio's picture
Researchers at the CSIR-Crops Research Institute (CSIR-CRI) in Ghana. © Dasan Bobo/World Bank 
Researchers at the CSIR-Crops Research Institute (CSIR-CRI) in Ghana. © Dasan Bobo/World Bank 

The South Asia region alone will need to create more than 13 million jobs every year to keep pace with its demographics. In Sub-Saharan Africa, despite a smaller population, the challenge will be even greater—15 million jobs will need to be created each year.
 
Adding complexity, the jobs challenge is also a concern for today. And as the trends of urbanization continue, scores of internal migrants are searching for work, but can’t find quality, waged jobs, nor do they have the skills demanded by the markets. As a result, too many people are left on the economic sidelines and are limited in what they can contribute to their countries’ growth.  


Pages


สล็อตออนไลน์ ฟรีโบนัส 100% เกมส์สล็อต GClub SlotPBET เครดิตฟรี 200 บาท แจกแล้วที่ 138 Bet - โบนัสคาสิโน sbobet ฟรีโบนัส 50% แทงบอลออนไลน์ สโบเบ็ต ผ่านมือถือ ROYAL777 เกมสล็อตมือถือ Gclub Slot - เกมส์สล็อต Royal Asia Online Slot เว็บไซต์รีวิวคาสิโนออนไลน์ และ สล็อตออนไลน์ อันดับหนึ่ง