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The gender gap in the disaster risk management sector: why it matters

Caren Grown's picture

Over the past decade, the practice of disaster risk management (DRM) has .  From mainly focusing on disaster response, local and international actors alike now emphasize the importance of preparedness and prevention – saving lives and avoiding losses even before disaster strikes.

Forging a path to progress for Haiti's water and sanitation

Carl Christian Jacobsen's picture
The lack of clean water and sanitation has been a major problem in Haiti for years.


In Haiti, lack of access to quality water and sanitation has hit the population severely, with the poorest citizens suffering the most. Between 1990 and 2015, the share of the population with access to potable water decreased from 62% to 52%. Sanitation is also a critical issue; over the same period, access to enhanced sanitation installations only increased by 1% among the poorest in the rural areas. Among the urban poor, it actually declined by 3%.

While the lack of clean water and sanitation has been a major problem in Haiti for years, the situation became dire in 2010 after a massive earthquake destroyed many of the existing sanitation systems.  As the poorest nation in the western hemisphere, Haiti is extremely vulnerable to natural hazards, with more than 90% of the population at risk. , and millions struggle to find clean drinking water.

The water and sanitation sector, however, now has solid means to achieve progress thanks to a close collaboration with the Government and to the efforts of the Direction nationale de l’eau potable et de l’assainissement (DINEPA): Tools have been designed to assess the situation, to map the available resources, and to address the challenges of the water and sanitation sector with a clear roadmap.

On January 29, a one-day workshop was organized by the World Bank in Port-au-Prince to present the findings of the latest studies focusing on the water and sanitation sectors and funded by the Bank and the DINEPA. After several years of dialogue and partnership between the Haitian Government and the donors’ community, this day of exchanges allowed stakeholders to take stock of the work accomplished so far.

What if we could use nature to prevent disasters?

Brenden Jongman's picture
 

Heavy rain and severe flooding brought the city of Colombo, Sri Lanka, to its knees. In China’s Yangtze River Basin, rivers spilled their banks, inundating towns and villages. In Mobile Bay, Alabama, strong ocean waves carried away valuable coastline.

In each of these locations, disasters caused by natural hazards seemed beyond human control. But instead of focusing only on building more drains, seawalls and dams, these governments turned to nature for protection from the disasters. Several years later, the urban wetlands, oyster reefs and flood plains they helped establish are now keeping their citizens safe while nourishing the local economies.

Women at work in East Asia Pacific: Solid progress but a long road ahead

Victoria Kwakwa's picture



East Asia Pacific’s (EAP) strong economic performance over the past few decades has significantly benefited and empowered women in the region, bringing better health and education and greater access to economic opportunities. To celebrate International Women’s Day, we are featuring who embody the advancements women have made in EAP, despite the many barriers that remain for them at work.

Surpassing all other developing regions, EAP’s female-to-male enrollment ratio for tertiary education is currently 1.2, with the ratio of secondary education access nearly equal for girls and boys. But

Process makes perfect: improving tax compliance and tax administration through behavioral insights

Jonathan Karver's picture

To a United States citizen, the Internal Revenue Services (IRS) might seem like the -the Spanish-speaker’s response to the Boogeyman -of public administration. They come after those of us dilly dallying with our accounts and are much better at seeking than we are at hiding. But should paying taxes really feel like La Llorona is coming after you? Evidence from three experimental tax trials in Kosovo would seem to suggest that behaviorally informed tools can increase voluntary tax compliance and especially improve the workings of a tax administration without resorting to fear. So how does behavioral science inform tax compliance?

Commodity prices rose modestly in February–Pink Sheet

John Baffes's picture

Energy commodity prices increased nearly 5 percent in February, led by oil (+8 percent), the World Bank’s Pink Sheet reported.

Non-energy prices gained 2 percent, in response to large price increases in metals and minerals.

Agricultural prices changed little, as increases in food and raw material prices (+0.5 percent each) were balanced by declines in beverages (-1.3 percent).

Fertilizer prices declined more than 2 percent, led by an 8 percent slide in DAP.

Paying for ecosystem services, a successful approach to reducing deforestation in Mexico

Stefano Pagiola's picture
The Jorullo in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico


For them, forested lands mean some fuelwood, timber, perhaps some fruit — benefits that are much lower than those they could get by cutting the trees down and cultivating the land or using it for pasture. It’s not surprising, then, that many of them choose to do so, resulting in high rates of deforestation throughout the world.

Judge leniency IV designs: Now not just for Crime Studies

David McKenzie's picture

For quite a few reasons, many researchers have become increasingly skeptical of a lot of attempts to use instrumental variables for causal estimation. However, one type of instrument that has enjoyed a surge in popularity is what is known as the “judge leniency” design. It has particularly caught my attention recently through a couple of applications where the judges are not actually court judges, and it seems like there could be quite a few other applications out there. I therefore thought I’d summarize this design, these recent applications, and key things to watch out for.

The basic judge leniency set-up.
This design appears to have gained first prominence through studies which look at the impact of different types of experience with the criminal legal system. A classic example is (2006, AER), who wants to look at the impact of incarceration length (S) on subsequent labor outcomes (Y). That is, he would like to estimate an equation like:

Y(i) = a + bS(i) + c’X(i)+ e(i)

The concern, of course, is that even controlling for observable differences X(i), people who get longer prison sentences might be different from those who get given shorter sentences, in ways that matter for future labor earnings.


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