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Disasters due to natural hazards are just the tip of the iceberg in MENA cities

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
 

Resilience is increasingly recognized as a key attribute of an effective urban system. Discussions on resilience often center around disasters caused by natural hazards. However, cities are increasingly exposed to multiple shocks and stresses beyond disasters. Cities in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are no different and are equally if not more vulnerable to a large set of shocks.

Building national civil registration systems that ensure effective service delivery

Samuel Mills's picture



Ensuring that each individual at birth has a unique identification, and that such civil registration is then linked with better and easier access to critical public services such as education, health, social welfare, and financial services is now a growing priority in many countries. Modern electronic systems for Civil Registrations and Vital Statistics (CRVS) can help make this process more efficient and effective.  Yet, most low-income countries still only use paper records for the registration of births, deaths, marriages, or divorces. Retrieving birth registration records, issuing a duplicate copy of a birth certificate or sharing civil registration data with other relevant agencies can be ineffective and time consuming with paper-based systems.

We want to hear from you about the World Development Report 2020 — Global Value Chains: Trading for Development

Pinelopi Goldberg's picture

Last month I announced that the 2020 World Development Report (WDR2020) will focus on global value chains (GVCs) and what they mean for development. Does participating in GVCs promote development? Why are some low-income developing countries reaping the benefits and others not? What can countries do to gain from trade and GVCs, particularly when new technologies are bringing change and the global status quo is in a state of flux? You can read my recent blog post for a summary of the Report’s objectives or read the directly.
 

Weekly links March 1: the path from development economics to philanthropy, nitty-gritty of survey implementation, blame your manager for your low productivity, and more...

David McKenzie's picture
  • The St Louis Fed has a new , highlighting not just academics, but also economists in the private sector and thinktanks – so far the only person among their 14 episodes who has worked on development economics is -  who shares how her work on development in turn led to an interest in the economics of Philanthropy.
  • In the IZA World of Labor, Ach Adhvaryu gives a nice summary of the emerging literature on the .
  • EGAP’s : lots of nitty-gritty advice on things like training, using PDAs, and budgeting.
  • On Let’s Talk Development, Caio Piza, Astrid Zwager and Isabela Furtado summarize results of an impact evaluation they did of productive alliances for farmers in Brazil. They find positive impacts of improving linkages between smallholder producers, buyers and the public sector through financing things like packinghouses, transport and logistics improvements, and constructing processing structures.

The learning crisis in Afghanistan

Iva Trako's picture



Although access to schooling has improved significantly in the last decade, fourth grade Afghan students are still not learning. After 4 years in primary school, only two-thirds of Afghan students have fully mastered the language curriculum for the first grade and less than half of them have mastered the mathematics curriculum for the first grade.

Securing sustainable livelihoods for waste pickers

Amal Faltas's picture

Today on Global Waste Picker Day, we explore the problem of solid waste management in the Gaza Strip and how it is compounded by poverty, unemployment, and severe restrictions imposed on residents
.

With a high unemployment rate in Gaza (53.7 percent), and every second person in Gaza living below the poverty line, residents of the Gaza Strip also face greater technical, environmental, social, institutional and financial challenges, due in large part to restricted access to goods and services. Frequent border closures cause considerable delays for the entry and servicing of waste management equipment and these delays contribute to a fragmented and poorly managed waste collection and disposal system - exacerbating public health and environmental concerns.

The jobs challenge is bigger than ever in the poorest countries

Akihiko Nishio's picture
Researchers at the CSIR-Crops Research Institute (CSIR-CRI) in Ghana. © Dasan Bobo/World Bank 
Researchers at the CSIR-Crops Research Institute (CSIR-CRI) in Ghana. © Dasan Bobo/World Bank 

The South Asia region alone will need to create more than 13 million jobs every year to keep pace with its demographics. In Sub-Saharan Africa, despite a smaller population, the challenge will be even greater—15 million jobs will need to be created each year.
 
Adding complexity, the jobs challenge is also a concern for today. And as the trends of urbanization continue, scores of internal migrants are searching for work, but can’t find quality, waged jobs, nor do they have the skills demanded by the markets. As a result, too many people are left on the economic sidelines and are limited in what they can contribute to their countries’ growth.  

In India, more exports can create better jobs and higher wages

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Exports to Jobs: Boosting the Gains from Trade in South Asia


. Despite strong growth, job creation remains weak and is often of poor quality.

This is especially true for India, which grew at a rate of 7.2 percent in 2017 and which managed to reduce the number of poor people considerably.

But the growth of new job opportunities is below what many had hoped for; . Strong population growth also puts pressure on labor markets, with millions of Indians entering the job market every year.

. And those who work often do so only in the informal sector, which is larger than in any other region in the world. Some groups, like women or workers in rural areas, are at particularly high risk of having to work in the informal economy, where wages are often lower.

Meanwhile, trade in goods as a share of the economy is much lower than in other regions. The trends in India and much of South Asia differ from other regions, where trade, growth, and jobs are directly connected and go hand in hand.

This South Asian paradox raises the question of how governments can boost job growth, and how to raise the quality of new jobs so that economic development brings more shared prosperity.

by the World Bank and the International Labour Organization (ILO) finds that increasing exports through globalization has the potential to contribute to a broader strategy for promoting growth, job creation and shared prosperity.

Powering industry and jobs in Gaza through rooftop solar

Layali H. Abdeen's picture



Gaza is one of the most fragile places in the world. Its 2 million people have lived under a blockade since 2007. Crammed within an area of only 365 square kilometers—about the size of Philadelphia—its mostly young and educated population has few economic opportunities, with unemployment topping 50 percent. As GDP per capita falls, more than half of its people have sunk below the poverty line, with few opportunities for prosperity. Only donor support is keeping the economy afloat.

In addition to that, Gaza is constrained by limited access to power—with only four hours per day of electricity. That creates a huge burden to ordinary people, who are forced to plan around the power schedule. But the lack of power is also crushing the life out of the manufacturing sector, which previously served as a major source of employment in Gaza. So, can we in the international development community do something to address this problem?
 

Join sector and communication specialists for a leadership, strategy and stakeholder analysis training course

Umou Al-Bazzaz's picture
Flora Bossey, center, Communication Officer, Edo SEEFOR Project, Nigeria, attended in 2015. © World Bank
Flora Bossey, center, Communication Officer, Edo SEEFOR Project, Nigeria, attended in 2015.
© World Bank

When Amr Abdellah Aly, a department manager at the Electricity Ministry in Egypt, returned home from the Summer Institute in California training course at last year, his first question to his supervisors was if they had a communications strategy in place for the efforts of reforms in the electricity sector. His goal was to stress on the important role of communications throughout the reform process, something he had just learned from the course.
 
Each summer, the World Bank collaborates with the  and the  to offer the executive education course on reform communication: Leadership, strategy and stakeholder alignment. 


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Kristalina Georgieva
Interim President of the World Bank Group and Chief Executive Officer of the World Bank
Annette Dixon
World Bank Vice President, Human Development

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