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More educated, less paid: what’s behind the gender gap in Mauritius?

Marco Ranzani's picture


Today, the gender gap in education in middle and high-income countries has mostly disappeared. In some countries, girls outstrip boys in schooling outcomes, yet women earn about 16% less money per hour worked than men ().

Mauritius is no exception. According to data from 2016, out of a student population of 33,269 in tertiary education, 56.6% are female and 43.4% male (). And yet, the high achievements of girls and young women in school are not carrying over to employment opportunities. The labor force participation rate of women is 57% compared with 88% for men. In the private sector, a Mauritian woman makes only $0.72 cents to a dollar made by men.

Cyclone Idai: Building climate and disaster resilience in Mozambique and beyond

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Mozambique after Cyclone Idai. Photo by Denis Onyodi / IFRC / DRK / Climate Centre via Flickr CC

Cyclone Idai is one of the most devastating storms to ever hit Africa, causing catastrophic damage in Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.
 
Starting off in early March 2019 as a tropical depression, the storm rapidly evolved into a cyclone, affecting over 2 million people and killing close to 1,000 in the three countries affected. The port city of Beira, Mozambique – the hardest hit – is struggling to reemerge from the rubble.

Profiting from parity: Addressing constraints to support women-owned businesses

Rachel Coleman's picture


Persistence, strength, tenacity and passion are just a few ways that some of Sub-Saharan Africa’s successful business women describe the secret to their success. This isn’t surprising; in Africa, women are more likely to be working than women in other regions, and they are more likely to be entrepreneurs than men. So, it makes sense these women have a resilience and power unmatched by many others. 

What does the rise of the robots mean for trade?

Bob Rijkers's picture

Industrial robots, 3D printing, and artificial intelligence are rapidly changing the face of global production and trade. Global sales of industrial robots reached a new record of 387,000 units last year and robot adoption is projected to grow in the coming years. Techno-pessimists fear that developing countries might lose the opportunity to export themselves out of poverty by linking into Global Value Chains (GVCs), as firms in rich countries relocate robot-driven production closer to home.

Introducing a video blog series on tackling fragility, conflict, and violence in Africa

Aly Rahim's picture
 


More than 300 million people in Africa live in countries affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV). Half of the 36 countries on the World Bank’s are in Africa. In West Africa, in particular, a surge in conflict since 2010 has sparked concerns.

Shaping a brighter future for Pakistan

Illango Patchamuthu's picture
Pakistan needs to think big on investing in its people
Pakistani girls attending a primary school. Photo: World Bank
This blog is part of a series that discusses findings from the  report, which identifies the changes necessary for Pakistan to become a strong upper middle-income country by the time it turns 100 years old in 2047. 
 
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I wonder what they will see when they look around. Will they see a country teeming with opportunity? Or will they be in a country that does not offer enough jobs and does not provide the needed skills to compete?

Some of them may well be new parents at 28. Will they be able to look at their own children, and see a brighter future for them?

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If the country can make the right decisions now, Pakistan can accelerate and sustain growth to become a confident upper middle-income by the time it turns 100. It’s ambitious but possible.

Other countries –South Korea, China, and Malaysia – have transformed their economies within a generation, and there is no reason why Pakistan cannot achieve the same.

The alternative is not inspiring. If the country fails to accelerate and sustain growth as well as control population growth, by 2047 income levels will be close to where they are today and with challenges similar to what they are today.

, and Pakistan competes with the likes of Shanghai or Singapore as a trading hub.

Last month we launched a report, , which looks at some of the reforms needed to accelerate and sustain growth and transform Pakistan’s economy.

Now is the time to come together and see what needs to be done to achieve this goal. A growth narrative for Pakistan needs to rest on these four elements: investing in people; using resources more efficiently; caring for the environment; and finally, improving how Pakistan is run to support growth and the implementation of difficult reforms.

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Paving the way for better lives in Bangladesh: A human capital story

Muneeza Mehmood Alam's picture
Bangladesh: Better roads for Better Lives

After improvements were made to a local road, Swapna Akhter, a Community Woman in Kalmakanda, Netrokona, can take patients more conveniently to the nearby hospital. Similarly, Ibrahim Talukder, Chairman of a Union Parishad in Fatikchari, Chittagong, has found that the cost of getting to the local health complex has substantially reduced after the paving of a local road.  

These stories demonstrate the intrinsic link between transport and human capital development. This connection is perhaps most obvious in rural areas, where improved mobility has transformed countless lives by unlocking economic opportunities and expanding access to essential services like healthcare or education.

The ongoing Second Rural Transport Improvement Project (RTIP-II) in Bangladesh is a case in point. We talked to several beneficiaries of the project—which supports road expansion and upgrading, and rural market development in 26 districts across the country, and the dredging of local waterways on a pilot basis—to understand how better connectivity had impacted their lives.

A new successful approach to portfolio performance in the Maghreb that could work everywhere

Afef Haddad's picture

When it comes to improving portfolio performance, the Maghreb Country Management Unit (CMU) has found a solution that worked well: Partnering with the Government counterparts to form a strong Implementation Support Team (IST)

In early March 2019, the World Bank hosted eight Government representatives from various ministries and institutions (including the Central Bank) from Algeria, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. These representatives form what the Maghreb CMU has called "the ISTs". They had a busy week of training on World Bank operations from Strategy to results on the ground and the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) evaluations. They even participated in the Quarterly MNA-Global Practices portfolio review to see first-hand how the region and the Global Practices partner together for better portfolio performance and were determined to replicate the approach with their sector ministries. These ISTs played a major role in improving the Maghreb portfolio performance and boosting its disbursement ratios and therefore are playing a major role in expediting results on the ground to the beneficiaries.

Energy prices rose in March—Pink Sheet

John Baffes's picture
Energy commodity prices rebounded in more than 3 percent in March, led by oil (+4 percent), the World Bank Pink Sheet reported. Coal and natural gas prices (Europe) declined 4 and 14 percent, respectively.

Non-energy prices declined marginally, with losses in beverages and food balanced by gains in raw material and metals.

Agricultural prices declined nearly one percent, with drops in beverages (-2.5 percent) and food (-1.5 percent) partly balanced by increases in raw materials (+1.4 percent).

Fertilizer prices declined almost one percent, reflecting losses in TSP and DAP (-6.7 and -6.2 percent, respectively) and gains in potassium (+14 percent).

Metals prices gained 1.2 percent, led by increases in zinc (+5.3 percent) and copper (+2.2 percent).

Precious metals prices declined nearly 2 percent in response to declines in silver (-3.3 percent) and gold (-1.5 percent).

The is a monthly report that monitors commodity price movements.
 
Nominal price indexes, percent changes, March over February

 

Everyone is a Potential Influencer: Effective PPP stakeholder engagement

Jeffrey Ghannam's picture




 
Many of us recognize that well-designed PPPs can help governments increase private-sector investment in public-sector infrastructure and allow government financing to be allocated to other priorities. With thoughtful stakeholder engagement strategies in place, PPPs have the potential to leverage the private sector’s expertise and innovation to ensure effective long-term management of public resources.


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